Calculation of pay weight

In addition to weight, an important factor determining the cost of the shipment is the space occupied by the goods. During the calculation of transport costs, the actual weight and volume weight, so called paid weight, is taken into account. The latter functions as a factor for the difference between the weight and volume. As you know, a ton of feathers takes up much more space than a ton of lead. In order to evenly take this difference into account, a volumetric factor was adopted for transport.

For each consignment the volumetric weight is calculated and then compared with the actual weight in kilograms. The calculations in question shall be made on the basis of the agreed formulae. Going further: in air transport 1 m3 is 167 kg, in Sea Freight (LCL) 1 m3 is calculated, as a maximum of 1000 kg, in road transport 1 m3 is 333 kg. The next is the fee for the highest weight (volumetric or actual).

Which weight affects the costs?

In the case of transport by sea, you can opt for a container shipment or the so-called LCL. Less then Container Load), that is, the sea bass. The second option is to load goods belonging to different owners into one container. The freight charge is calculated according to the occupied space in the container. 

The calculation is based on the size/weight (W/M) method: per cubic metre ('size') or per tonne ('weight'). Costs are calculated according to the higher volume in cubic metres or weight in tonnes, but with a different indication.

Air transport: 1 m3 = 167 kg (1:6 volume ratio)

Road transport: 1 m3 = 333 kilograms (1:3 volume ratio)

Sea freight: 1 m3 = 1 000 kg (volume ratio 1:1)

The final freight costs, i.e. the "payable" weight is calculated based on the higher value of the two "weights" above. In a situation where products take up more space to be settled, a volumetric weight is assumed.

How do you calculate the volumetric weight?

In order to calculate the volumetric weight, the first step is to determine the volume of the shipment, i.e. its length x width x height in centimetres. Then, the result should be divided by the following coefficients:

N

Air transport: 6 000

N

Road transport: 3 000

N

Maritime transport: 1 000

What about the running meters of the load space for road transport?

In road transport, it is common practice to make calculations in running meters of load space. One loading metre is equivalent to one metre of floor in the cross-section of a semi-trailer. Very often this unit is used for products that cannot be stacked in any way. This allows the haulier to offset the costs due to unused loading space. The most common load space is 1,850 kg per linear metre. This unit is equally easy to calculate for pallets: 1 euro pallet (80 x 120 cm) is 0.4 metres of loading space and 1 industrial pallet (100 x 120 cm) is 0.5 metres.

What is meant by size/weight in maritime transport?

Maritime transport enables container or LCL shipment. Less then Container Load), that is, the sea bass. The second possibility is to load goods belonging to different owners into one common container. The freight charge is calculated according to the space occupied. In this case, the calculation is based on the size/weight (W/M) method: per cubic metre ("size") or per tonne ("weight"). The costs are calculated according to the higher volume in cubic metres or weight in tonnes, but with a different indication.

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